first big-girl paper!

In case you missed my facebook/twitter/researchgate/everything blitz, I finally published my first first-authored paper! It is in Oecologia, a good general ecology journal. I’m really happy and proud of myself, and a number of people have told me that this paper you’ll be happiest and most satisfied to publish, ever. I’m certainly enjoying the new addition to my CV.

Here’s a link to the paper, and here’s an abstract:

“Alpine plant communities are predicted to face range shifts and possibly extinctions with climate change. Fine-scale environmental variation such as nutrient availability or snowmelt timing may contribute to the ability of plant species to persist locally; however, variation in nutrient availability in alpine landscapes is largely unmeasured. On three mountains around Davos, Switzerland, we deployed Plant Root Simulator probes around 58 Salix herbacea plants along an elevational and microhabitat gradient to measure nutrient availability during the first 5 weeks of the summer growing season, and used in situ temperature loggers and observational data to determine date of spring snowmelt. We also visited the plants weekly to assess performance, as measured by stem number, fruiting, and herbivory damage. We found a wide snowmelt gradient which determined growing season length, as well as variations of an order of magnitude or more in the accumulation of 12 nutrients between different microhabitats. Higher nutrient availability had negative effects on most shrub performance metrics, for instance decreasing stem number and the proportion of stems producing fruits. High nutrient availability was associated with increased herbivory damage in early-melting microhabitats, but among late-emerging plants this pattern was reversed. We demonstrate that nutrient availability is highly variable in alpine settings, and that it strongly influences performance in an alpine dwarf shrub, sometimes modifying the response of shrubs to snowmelt timing. As the climate warms and human-induced nitrogen deposition continues in the Alps, these factors may contribute to patterns of local plants persistence.”

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One thought on “first big-girl paper!

  1. So super proud of your accomplishment. It is an amazing step in scholarship. Thought of you last week while at Baxter State Park. This time only Pedro went up Katahdin as I was not about to hold four youngsters top of the state runners. I am in shape but not with them. So this time I did not get to see up close the rare and unique species that grow in the alpine area above tree line, instead Pablo, Todd and a friend climbed up a different peak and found two rare land orchids the next day. I thought of you and your work and of how exciting some scientists here might be to read your article. Thanks for sending the link. Best of cares and have fun with Emily!

    Christa

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